Howard Be Thy Name

Howard Be Thy NameHoward Be Thy Name by JoAnn Stevelos
Published by Createspace on August 3rd 2017
Pages: 134
ISBN: 1544769040
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three-half-stars

This book is based on a true story.

The book begins in 1968 as Evie, a divorced mother of four learns some heartbreaking and troubling news. She had entered a relationship with Howard Russo, a newly ordained Catholic Priest not fully knowing or understanding the consequence this relationship will have on her children. Their lives become full of secrets, lies and pain. Upon learning the revelations, she is forced to decide – to make a choice between her children and Howard.

This is a small book really, but heavy in subject matter – this is a story of child sexual abuse. This book looks at a woman’s best intentions to make a better life for she and her children do not turn out as planned. How she turns a blind eye until she can’t live in denial any longer. How secrets and lies can harm a child. How living in an unsafe environment has harmful and lasting effects on a child.

This is also the story of a Priest who wanted to help a family and ended up harming them. How he lost his way, how his past is affecting his present, how he wanted initially to do good and ended up doing harm.

This book deals with a sensitive subject and may be a trigger for some. This is the first book in a trilogy which will follow the families in this book. I really appreciated that this book contained resources for child sexual abuse survivors at the end. Although, this book deals with sensitive and heavy subject matter, I found it to be a somewhat fast read. It is well written, and you will feel for the characters – either positively or negatively. I was happy to learn that there are more books to come as I was left wanting to know more about this family’s situation and how they would move forward with their lives. This book will make you feel and will make you angry – it evokes emotion.

I was given a copy of this book to read by the Author in exchange for an honest review.

three-half-stars