Avery: The Case Against Steven Avery and What -Making a Murderer- Gets Wrong

Avery: The Case Against Steven Avery and What -Making a Murderer- Gets WrongAvery: The Case Against Steven Avery and What -Making a Murderer- Gets Wrong by Ken Kratz
on January 1st 1970
ISBN: 1944648003
Buy on Amazon
three-half-stars

I think I am the rare person who did not watch Making a Murderer. I tend not to read other reviews after I receive a book, but I did read then with this book. I read that a lot of people have made mention of Making of a Murderer and that they did not like how it was mentioned so much in this book. The televisions show was mentioned a lot in this book. I believe that Author did so for many reasons. He was a prosecutor on this case and did not like that not all the evidence was provided on the show and that what was provided was skewed and did not give the viewer the full story.Is this book guilty of being a tell all? Isn’t that what this book is? The Author telling the story from his viewpoint as a prosecutor?

Was this writers bias skewed because he was the Prosecutor and felt a need to not only give the full story but also to paint himself into a more positive light after he tarnished his own professional career and ended his marriage after being reported for inappropriate texts he sent? I believe both. I believe he felt the need to tell the entire story and to give the reader (and perhaps viewer of the TV show) a picture of the victim, how she was lured and how she was murdered and her body burnt. I also feel this was his attempt to tell his story and explain why he choose the inappropriate actions he took. The Author makes no bones about having an issue with the the show. As I mentioned, I never watched the show, but Kratz does make a point to show excerpts of full testimony vs. condensed testimony that was shown on the TV program. I can’t speak about the validity of the television program, but this man was the prosecutor on the case and I do believe he is giving the prosecutors point of view.

I mention quite often in my reviews that I have a forensic background and that is what speaks to me in this book. I like reading about all things related to forensics. While some people may find blood spatter analysis or autopsy results boring, forensics gets my juices flowing. I do wish there was more about the forensics in this case – I think most readers would be able to follow and be able to draw their own conclusions. I would have liked to see actual testimony transcripts.

Was Avery guilty of murder? He seemed definitely capable of it. Women in his life paint an ugly picture of him – specifically his abuse, there are letters he wrote in prison, recorded phone conversations. This man was not a nice person. In fact, he comes off as a misogynist. Plus, his story changed multiple times. I do agree with the prosecution, specifically when it comes to Avery’s accounts of the day in question. If you are innocent, why do you need to keep changing your story and would so much forensic evidence and bones be on your property? If he was framed as his defense claims he was, someone went to a lot of detail to hide her vehicle, have the license plate, DNA and her body burned on his property. I do not believe he was an innocent man.

I enjoyed the book. I have no desire to watch the Netflix series. I do feel the Netflix program was mentioned quite a bit but if information was skewed or given in a misleading way, then I can understand this writer’s attempt to set the record straight. I understand that the Author tarnished his reputation following this case – I’m sure he included that to show that he is being honest and upfront in this book. Crime buffs and perhaps those who watched the show may find this book interesting.

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

three-half-stars

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